Florise R. Neville-Ewell

Florise R. Neville-Ewell

Professor

B.A., cum laude, Yale University 1981
J.D. Yale University 1984

nevillef@cooley.edu

Florise R. Neville-Ewell is a Professor at Thomas M. Cooley Law School and teaches Contracts and Ethics. Professor Neville-Ewell has published articles for academia and the public. As an academic, her most recent article awaiting publication is entitled A Slice of History Underlying the Current Financial Pandemic: Black Women and Property 1800-1850 - Black Women as Property. Sequels to the article are in progress. For the lay community, Professor Neville-Ewell has also published multiple articles regarding real estate issues in publications sponsored by Charter One Bank. In conjunction with being a faculty advisor for the Ten Commandments of Real Estate Law Society at Cooley Law School (Real Estate Law Society), a student organization dedicated to educating the public through outreach and articles released through 10CORE.COM™, Professor Neville-Ewell continues to also write for the public.

Before joining the faculty at Cooley, Professor Neville-Ewell started her career as a law clerk for the Honorable Julian A. Cook, Jr., a federal District Court judge in the Eastern District of Michigan. A native Chicagoan, she returned to Chicago after the clerkship to work as an associate at Sidley and Austin. After marrying the Honorable Edward Ewell, Jr., she returned to Michigan to work as an associate at Honigman Miller and later joined the faculty at Wayne State Law School where she taught Property and Real Estate Finance. During the interim period, after teaching at Wayne State but before joining the Cooley faculty, she worked as General Counsel for the Detroit Housing Commission and as Chief of Contracts for the City of Detroit Law Department; and, in private practice, as counsel for multiple nonprofits, churches, private entities, and municipalities involved in residential, affordable housing, and commercial real estate development projects.

A frequent speaker, President Obama's Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force recently selected Professor Neville-Ewell to participate as a panelist at a Mortgage Fraud Summit. In addition, she periodically speaks on a radio program sponsored by the Detroit Area Agency on Aging, was once responsible for providing weekly "hot tips" about mortgage issues on a radio program sponsored by Comerica Bank, and has spoken at events sponsored by AARP, the NAACP, the Michigan Attorney General’s Office, and Fifth Third Bank.

Professor Neville-Ewell has received awards and acknowledgments for her work and pro bono projects. Most recently in 2010, Cooley law students were instrumental in helping her win Cooley sponsored awards (namely, the Great Deeds Award because of her commitment to serving others and the Equal Access to Justice Award because of her commitment to improving justice for all). As a result of work done with the Real Estate Law Society in 2010, Michigan State Bar President, Charles R. Toy and United States Attorney (for the Eastern District of Michigan) Barbara L. McQuade acknowledged her work and the student organization’s significance. Specifically, U.S. Attorney McQuade stated "[this] program . . . will make a big difference not only in the lives of the citizens you educate, but in the lives of law students who will see the value of public service." In connection with select prior projects, the State of Michigan issued a Moment of Tribute in 2006 (for work done as an appointed member and chairperson of the Michigan State Housing Development Authority). In 1995, former City of Detroit Mayor Dennis W. Archer gave her a Making It Better Proclamation for work done on behalf of the city.

Professor Neville-Ewell and her husband have two children, Edward Neville Ewell and Simone-Alyse Ewell.

Bibliography

Articles

Florise R. Neville-Ewell, Statutory Redemption Rights Revisited: 21st Century Factors for the Legislature to Consider, 30 Thomas M. Cooley L. Rev. ___ (forthcoming 2014).

Florise Neville-Ewell, A Slice of History Underlying the Current Financial Pandemic. Black Women and Property 1800 to 1850: Black Women as Property, 2 J. of Race, Gender, and Poverty 1 (2010-2011).

Florise R. Neville-Ewell, Residential Real Estate Transactions: The AIDS Influence, 5 Hofstra Prop. L.J. 301 (1993).

 

Real-World Experience

Specialties: Property, Real Estate

Courses: Contracts and Ethics


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